Paint Garage Door

Paint Garage Door

Whether you like it or not, a street-facing, overhead garage door takes over a home’s facade, forcing itself into the role of focal point. The front of a typical double garage often takes up a third of the typical ranch home’s face. For this reason, if you have a garage door that needs attention it shouts that your whole home needs attention. You may not be able to paint your home’s siding yourself, but anyone can paint a garage door. And a new-looking garage door goes a long way to boost your curb appeal. I’ve painted many garage doors. This time I stood back and took photos while my dear Mr. Lucky painted a client’s. Here is the step by step to help you do it yourself. There’s a right way and a wrong way to DIY a garage door repaint. The wrong way takes hours, makes a mess of splatters on the concrete, and leaves gaps of old paint color at the ends of the panels when the door is opened. Here is the right way. As with all DIY projects, having the right tools and supplies is the first step to getting good results with the least effort. So, gather these materials. Exterior paint A clean 1-gallon work bucket. 3-inch latex brush Stir stick Sanding sponge Old brush for dusting Rags Dropcloth Step stool 5-in-1 tool or paint can opener How Much Paint? The amount of paint you’ll need depends on a few factors. An aluminum door (most today are aluminum) will need less paint than a wooden door. If you are repainting the same color, you’ll need less paint than if you are drastically changing the color. And, of course, if the garage is a single, you’ll need less paint than a two car garage door needs. Whether you have glass panels in the door, or not, isn’t really a factor. So, unless you are painting a single car garage door the same color, I would suggest that you buy a gallon of paint rather than a quart. When you buy a gallon, it’s like getting a quart free because of the price break. You’re likely to find other uses for the paint. You might want to freshen your exterior trim if it is the same color, some shutters, a planter or window box, or some outdoor furniture. Painting an overhead garage door is a whole lot easier than painting a front door. But some of the same cautions apply: Choose a windless day that’s not too hot or too cold, and when you can work without distractions and interruptions. (Moms of young ones, take heart. In the time it takes a toddler to have his afternoon nap, you should be able to start and finish.) Ever notice that hanging pull on your garage ceiling? If you tug the red handle, you’ll disengage the electric opener. That’s what you want. Now you’re ready tomove the garage door up and down manually from outside. Inevitably, the garage door will have dust, dirt, cobwebs, and oxidized paint , so you’ll want toclean it. Easiest way is to take a sanding block to the entire door. Push the door up and down manually to quickly go over the whole surface.Pay attention to the gasket on the bottom edge so no dirt gets in your paint.Remember that you’re not painting an interior piece of fine furniture, so the surface doesn’t have to be perfect. Use an old paintbrush or a rag to get rid of dust and dirt stirred up my your sanding. Then place a large dropcloth under the partly raised the door to protect both the driveway and garage floor. Use your stir stick to stir the paint, even if it was shaken at the paint store. Pour only a quart into a clean work bucket, like an empty paint can. Wipe the lip of the original can, replace the lid tightly, and set it out of the way. Begin brushing the door at the bottom. Move the door up manually so you are not stooping over to paint. Do not paint the gasket on the bottom edge unless it was painted previously and needs a repaint. Paint just one lengthwise hinged panel at time. Paint the extreme ends of the panels as best you can. If you plan to paint the trim surrounding the door, you don’t have to be fussy about keeping paint off the trim. It’s easier to paint the extreme ends of the panels when they are at the very top of the door opening, as above. You’ll have to reach up or use the step stool to paint the them. When the panel you’ve finished is at the top of the opening, paint the edges of both the upper and lower panels, the “lips” where they meet. Since this area does not receive much direct sun or weather, it’s not necessary to go heavy with the paint, so do not load your brush. When you get to the top panel, make sure the drop cloth covers the ground before lowering the door. Use a step stool to stand on rather than stretching to reach the top panel. Check the entire door for runs, drips, and misses. Now’s the time to paint the trim around the door. This homeowner chose to have the siding, the trim and the overhead door all the same color. It’s a contemporary, no-nonsense look that is fine for modern homes. Next week we’ll spray her brick foundation white, and brush the siding grey. The finished door looks like new. Painting the door took about an hour. If your door needs two coats for good covereage, you could put on a second coat the same day if the first coat is thoroughly dry. Or just wait until the next good painting day. Would you refresh your own overhead garage door with paint? There are plenty of simple staging tricks and secrets that are even simpler than this in my home staging pdf. Put your home to work for you! For just $4.99 you can download my eBook, DIY Home Staging Tips to Sell Your Home Fast and for Top Dollar right now and begin making your home the one that real estate buyers want!
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Paint Garage Door

Like it or not, your garage door directly influences the visual style of your home. After all, the surface area of the average garage door comprises nearly a third of a home’s face. Luckily, you can do something about it by repainting over the bland, stock finish—or worn, decrepit finish if it’s quite old. Do it right, and the door will look amazing, blending in well with the existing style and theme of your home. Do it wrong, and let’s just say you probably would have been better off leaving the door as is. Before you get started, here are a few tips to ensure the job is done right. How much paint? The amount of paint you’ll need depends on two factors: how big the garage door is and what kind of material it’s made of. If you don’t know what material your garage door is, take a look at this handy guide to figure out what kind you have installed. A wooden door, for example, will take a lot more paint to cover than an aluminum door. To add to that, if you’re painting the same shade or tone, then you won’t need as much; but if you’re going from a light to dark or dark to light color, then you’ll need more. Your best and safest bet is to buy an entire gallon of the color you need. This should give you an ample supply of paint to get the job done, plus some extra paint in case you need to retouch at a later date. If the garage door is steel or aluminum you’ll want to use high-quality latex exterior house paint. In addition, it’s worth noting that you should never paint metal outdoors in extremely wet, cold, or hot weather conditions. This is because metal and alloy will shift and expand depending on the temperature, and so the paint will not dry at optimal levels. This can cause the paint to look cracked or faded once dry. If the garage door is wood, you’ll want to apply a primer—after sanding, of course—and then paint. When it comes to wood, you can be a bit choosier with the kind of paint that you use. Be sure that it’s at least tailored for outdoor use. Preparations Before you can start painting, there are a few things you’ll need to do. Aside from purchasing the gallon of paint and all the necessary supplies, you’ll also need to get the door ready. It’s likely covered in dust, dirt, grime, cobwebs, or oxidized paint. The most efficient way to clean it is to pressure wash both sides (if possible) and let it air dry. Then take a sanding block and scrub down the entire surface of the door. Luckily, it’s a garage door, so it’s not like you need to sand the surface perfectly even. Instead, you just want to make sure that you get all the nasty grit and grime off of it, otherwise your coat of paint is going to look shoddy. Check the hinges, sides, and sanding underneath for the same dirt, cobwebs, and nasty buildup. If you don’t care about getting drips of paint on your garage floor or driveway, then you can skip this next step. Otherwise, lay down a drop cloth or old blanket underneath to catch any excess paint. In addition, you’ll want to tape up the trim around the door unless you’re going to repaint that, too. Painting tips To be honest, you can paint the garage door exactly the way you’d paint any other surface. Use long, slow strokes. Cover an area with a single coat and let it dry before applying another. Don’t worry, we have a few extra tips you can heed while painting, which should help you get a better finish out of the deal. It’s a good idea to paint just one lengthwise panel at a time, stopping at the hinges. To paint the ends of the panels, slide the door up until the hinge separates, giving you room to maneuver. You might have to reach above your head or use a small stepstool to reach the panel ends when using this method, but it allows you to cover the entire surface. You can also paint the upper and lower lips of each panel this way, as well. Unique painting ideas If you just want a solid, even color across the entire door, you can use a roller and a brush for the smaller surface areas. If you want to paint the door so that you can see brush strokes, you’ll want to stick with a paintbrush. If the garage door is wood, you can sand it down completely to remove any old layers of paint or primer and then stain it. You’ll want to find a shade that matches your house, but you can also get pretty creative with how you cover the door. For example, with a bit of ingenuity you can make it look old and worn, while retaining its attractiveness. With aluminum doors, you could get creative with your patterns or styles. It just depends on how good you are with a brush. In no time, you should have that ugly, old garage door looking clean and fresh. This post was written by guest contributor James White from HomeyImprovements.com.

Paint Garage Door

Paint Garage Door
Paint Garage Door
Paint Garage Door
Paint Garage Door
Paint Garage Door